Interventional Radiology

Interventional radiologists are doctors who specialize in image-guided procedures to diagnose and treat a wide variety of diseases and disorders. They use their expertise in x-ray, ultrasound, MRI and other diagnostic imaging to guide very small instruments through the skin and into the body. These  procedures are less invasive than surgery and therefore tend to be better tolerated, have fewer complications, have faster recovery periods, and can result in shorter hospital stays.

Physicians who subspecialize in interventional radiology are different than general radiologists. They are board-certified radiologists  with subspecialty training in interventional radiology. Interventional radiology are involved in direct patient care in the hospital setting as well as at our Vanishing Veins outpatient clinic. We work closely with referring providers to take the best course of action for our patients.  Our interventional providers routinely round on hospitalized patients who have undergo a variety of interventional procedures.

General Procedures:

Angiogram

Balloon Angioplasty

Biliary Drainage and Stenting

Biopsy

Chemoembolization

Embolization

Joint Injection

Transhepatic Cholangiogram

Nephorstomy or Ureteral Stent Placement

Port Removal

PICC Line Replacement or Change

Port Check

Cryoablation or Radiofrequency (RF) Portosystemic Ablation

Thrombolysis

TIPS (Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt)

Facet Block

Nerve Root Block

P.A.S. PORT

Vertebroplasty

Uterine Fibroid Embolization

Facial Aesthetics

Preparation for Procedures with Sedation:

Angiogram

Preparation:

Do not eat or drink after midnight on the night before your procedure. Most people can continue to take their prescribed medicines with small sips of water. If you are diabetic and take insulin, ask your doctor about modifying your insulin dose for the day of your procedure. If you are taking the oral medications for diabetes such as metformin (Glucophage, Glumetza, Fortamet), you will need to discontinue use 48 hours prior to the procedure and 48 hours following the procedure. Consult with your doctor about blood sugar control during this period.

If you take a blood thinner (anticoagulant) such as warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel (Plavix), apixaban (Eliquis), heparin or enoxaparin, rivaroxaban (Xarelto), or dabigatran (Pradaxa) you must ask the prescribing provider if the medication can be temporarily stopped for your procedure. The number of days to reverse the blood thinning properties of your medication is variable, depending on which medication you have been prescribed. The radiology department can help guide you on when to stop taking your medication. Please note that this list of blood thinners is not comprehensive. Talk to your prescribing provider if you have any questions about your blood thinning medications. Bring all of your medications with you.

You will likely receive intravascular iodinated contrast during this procedure. If you have experienced adverse reactions to intravenous (IV) contrast (x-ray dye) or iodine such as skin rash, difficulty breathing, or anaphylaxis, then please let your doctor and the radiology department know as soon as possible. Your doctors can then plan to take special precautions during the procedure or prescribe special medications prior to the procedure.

Do not smoke for at least 24 hours before your procedure.

Blood tests are usually done on the day of the procedure. Before your procedure, you will dress in a hospital gown and an intravenous (IV) line will be placed in one of your veins. The IV will be used to give you fluids and medicines during the procedure and will stay in place until after your procedure is completed.

You may need to remove your jewelry, and any oral appliances such as dentures or partials.

The recovery period after the procedure is variable but is usually between 4 – 6 hours. Patients must have someone to drive them home following the procedure.

Balloon Angioplasty

Preparation: See the Preparation section for Angiogram.

Biliary Drainage and Stenting

Preparation:

Do not eat or drink after midnight on the night before your procedure. Most people can continue to take their prescribed medicines with small sips of water. If you are diabetic and take insulin, ask your doctor about modifying your insulin dose for the day of your procedure.

If you take a blood thinner (anticoagulant) such as warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel (Plavix), apixaban (Eliquis), heparin or enoxaparin, rivaroxaban (Xarelto), or dabigatran (Pradaxa) you must ask the prescribing provider if the medication can be temporarily stopped for your procedure. The number of days to reverse the blood thinning properties of your medication is variable, depending on which medication you have been prescribed. The radiology department can help guide you on when to stop taking your medication. Please note that this list of blood thinners is not comprehensive. Talk to your prescribing provider if you have any questions about your blood thinning medications. Bring all of your medications with you.

Do not smoke for at least 24 hours before your procedure.

Blood tests are usually done on the day of the procedure. Before your procedure, you will dress in a hospital gown and an intravenous (IV) line will be placed in one of your veins. The IV will be used to give you fluids and medicines such as antibiotics during the procedure and will stay in place until after your procedure is completed.

You may need to remove your jewelry, and any oral appliances such as dentures or partials.

If you are discharged on the same day as the procedure, then you must have someone other than yourself as a driver.

Biopsy

Preparation:

Do not eat or drink after midnight on the night before your procedure. Most people can continue to take their prescribed medicines with small sips of water. If you are diabetic and take insulin, ask your doctor about modifying your insulin dose for the day of your procedure.

If you take a blood thinner (anticoagulant) such as warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel (Plavix), apixaban (Eliquis), heparin or enoxaparin, rivaroxaban (Xarelto), or dabigatran (Pradaxa) you must ask the prescribing provider if the medication can be temporarily stopped for your procedure. The number of days to reverse the blood thinning properties of your medication is variable, depending on which medication you have been prescribed. The radiology department can help guide you on when to stop taking your medication. Please note that this list of blood thinners is not comprehensive. Talk to your prescribing provider if you have any questions about your blood thinning medications. Bring all of your medications with you.

Do not smoke for at least 24 hours before your procedure.

Blood tests are usually done on the day of the procedure. Before your procedure, you will dress in a hospital gown and an intravenous (IV) line will be placed in one of your veins. The IV will be used to give you fluids and medicines during the procedure and will stay in place until after your procedure is completed.

You may need to remove your jewelry, and any oral appliances such as dentures or partials.

The recovery period after the procedure is variable but is usually between 1 – 2 hours. Patients must have someone to drive them home following the procedure.

Chemoembolization

Preparation:

Do not eat or drink after midnight on the night before your procedure. Most people can continue to take their prescribed medicines with small sips of water. If you are diabetic and take insulin, ask your doctor about modifying your insulin dose for the day of your procedure. If you are taking the oral medications for diabetes such as metformin (Glucophage, Glumetza, Fortamet), you will need to discontinue use 48 hours prior to the procedure and 48 hours following the procedure. Consult with your doctor about blood sugar control during this period.

If you take a blood thinner (anticoagulant) such as warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel (Plavix), apixaban (Eliquis), heparin or enoxaparin, rivaroxaban (Xarelto), or dabigatran (Pradaxa) you must ask the prescribing provider if the medication can be temporarily stopped for your procedure. The number of days to reverse the blood thinning properties of your medication is variable, depending on which medication you have been prescribed. The radiology department can help guide you on when to stop taking your medication. Please note that this list of blood thinners is not comprehensive. Talk to your prescribing provider if you have any questions about your blood thinning medications. Bring all of your medications with you.

You will likely receive intravascular iodinated contrast during this procedure. If you have experienced adverse reactions to intravenous (IV) contrast (x-ray dye) or iodine such as skin rash, difficulty breathing, or anaphylaxis, then please let your doctor and the radiology department know as soon as possible. Your doctors can then plan to take special precautions during the procedure or prescribe special medications prior to the procedure.

Do not smoke for at least 24 hours before your procedure.

Blood tests are usually done on the day of the procedure. Before your procedure, you will dress in a hospital gown and an intravenous (IV) line will be placed in one of your veins. The IV will be used to give you fluids and medicines during the procedure and will stay in place until after your procedure is completed.

You may need to remove your jewelry, and any oral appliances such as dentures or partials.

The recovery period after the procedure is variable but is usually between 4 – 6 hours.

Your interventional radiologist may elect to have you stay in the hospital for at least one night to make sure that we can promptly tend to your needs should you develop some of the side effects of the procedure such as pain, nausea, and vomiting. However, if you are discharged on the same day as the procedure, then you must have a person other than yourself as a driver.

Embolization

Preparation:

Do not eat or drink after midnight on the night before your procedure. Most people can continue to take their prescribed medicines with small sips of water. If you are diabetic and take insulin, ask your doctor about modifying your insulin dose for the day of your procedure. If you are taking the oral medications for diabetes such as metformin (Glucophage, Glumetza, Fortamet), you will need to discontinue use 48 hours prior to the procedure and 48 hours following the procedure. Consult with your doctor about blood sugar control during this period.

If you take a blood thinner (anticoagulant) such as warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel (Plavix), apixaban (Eliquis), heparin or enoxaparin, rivaroxaban (Xarelto), or dabigatran (Pradaxa) you must ask the prescribing provider if the medication can be temporarily stopped for your procedure. The number of days to reverse the blood thinning properties of your medication is variable, depending on which medication you have been prescribed. The radiology department can help guide you on when to stop taking your medication. Please note that this list of blood thinners is not comprehensive. Talk to your prescribing provider if you have any questions about your blood thinning medications. Bring all of your medications with you.

You will likely receive intravascular iodinated contrast during this procedure. If you have experienced adverse reactions to intravenous (IV) contrast (x-ray dye) or iodine such as skin rash, difficulty breathing, or anaphylaxis, then please let your doctor and the radiology department know as soon as possible. Your doctors can then plan to take special precautions during the procedure or prescribe special medications prior to the procedure.

Do not smoke for at least 24 hours before your procedure.

Blood tests are usually done on the day of the procedure. Before your procedure, you will dress in a hospital gown and an intravenous (IV) line will be placed in one of your veins. The IV will be used to give you fluids and medicines during the procedure and will stay in place until after your procedure is completed.

You may need to remove your jewelry, and any oral appliances such as dentures or partials.

The recovery period after the procedure is variable but is usually between 4 – 6 hours. If you are discharged on the same day as the procedure, then you must have a person other than yourself as a driver.

Joint Injections

Preparation:

When scheduling for this exam please notify the staff if you are currently on blood thinners or have had prior contrast reaction.

Transhepatic Cholangiogram

Preparation:

Do not eat or drink after midnight on the night before your procedure. Most people can continue to take their prescribed medicines with small sips of water. If you are diabetic and take insulin, ask your doctor about modifying your insulin dose for the day of your procedure.

If you take a blood thinner (anticoagulant) such as warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel (Plavix), apixaban (Eliquis), heparin or enoxaparin, rivaroxaban (Xarelto), or dabigatran (Pradaxa) you must ask the prescribing provider if the medication can be temporarily stopped for your procedure. The number of days to reverse the blood thinning properties of your medication is variable, depending on which medication you have been prescribed. The radiology department can help guide you on when to stop taking your medication. Please note that this list of blood thinners is not comprehensive. Talk to your prescribing provider if you have any questions about your blood thinning medications. Bring all of your medications with you.

Do not smoke for at least 24 hours before your procedure.

Blood tests are usually done on the day of the procedure. Before your procedure, you will dress in a hospital gown and an intravenous (IV) line will be placed in one of your veins. The IV will be used to give you fluids and medicines during the procedure and will stay in place until after your procedure is completed.

You may need to remove your jewelry, and any oral appliances such as dentures or partials.

The recovery period after the procedure is variable but is usually between 1-4 hours. If you are discharged on the same day as the procedure, then you must have a person other than yourself as a driver.

Nephrostomy or Ureteral Stent Placement

Preparation:

Do not eat or drink after midnight on the night before your procedure. Most people can continue to take their prescribed medicines with small sips of water. If you are diabetic and take insulin, ask your doctor about modifying your insulin dose for the day of your procedure.

If you take a blood thinner (anticoagulant) such as warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel (Plavix), apixaban (Eliquis), heparin or enoxaparin, rivaroxaban (Xarelto), or dabigatran (Pradaxa) you must ask the prescribing provider if the medication can be temporarily stopped for your procedure. The number of days to reverse the blood thinning properties of your medication is variable, depending on which medication you have been prescribed. The radiology department can help guide you on when to stop taking your medication. Please note that this list of blood thinners is not comprehensive. Talk to your prescribing provider if you have any questions about your blood thinning medications. Bring all of your medications with you.

Do not smoke for at least 24 hours before your procedure.

Blood tests are usually done on the day of the procedure. Before your procedure, you will dress in a hospital gown and an intravenous (IV) line will be placed in one of your veins. The IV will be used to give you fluids and medicines during the procedure and will stay in place until after your procedure is completed.

You may need to remove your jewelry, and any oral appliances such as dentures or partials.

The recovery period after the procedure is variable but is usually between 2 – 4 hours. If you are discharged on the same day as the procedure, then you must have a person other than yourself as a driver.

Port Removal

Preparation:

Do not eat or drink after midnight on the night before your procedure. Most people can continue to take their prescribed medicines with small sips of water. If you are diabetic and take insulin, ask your doctor about modifying your insulin dose for the day of your procedure.

If you take a blood thinner (anticoagulant) such as warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel (Plavix), apixaban (Eliquis), heparin or enoxaparin, rivaroxaban (Xarelto), or dabigatran (Pradaxa) you must ask the prescribing provider if the medication can be temporarily stopped for your procedure. The number of days to reverse the blood thinning properties of your medication is variable, depending on which medication you have been prescribed. The radiology department can help guide you on when to stop taking your medication. Please note that this list of blood thinners is not comprehensive. Talk to your prescribing provider if you have any questions about your blood thinning medications. Bring all of your medications with you.

Do not smoke for at least 24 hours before your procedure.

Blood tests may be needed on the day of the procedure. Before your procedure, you will dress in a hospital gown and an intravenous (IV) line may be placed in one of your veins. Sometimes, IV fluids and medicines during the procedure.

You may need to remove your jewelry, and any oral appliances such as dentures or partials.

The recovery period after the procedure is variable but is usually 1 hour. If you receive sedation for this procedure, then you must have a person other than yourself as a driver.

PICC Line Placement and Change

Preparation:

Do not eat or drink after midnight on the night before your procedure. Most people can continue to take their prescribed medicines with small sips of water. If you are diabetic and take insulin, ask your doctor about modifying your insulin dose for the day of your procedure.

If you take a blood thinner (anticoagulant) such as warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel (Plavix), apixaban (Eliquis), heparin or enoxaparin, rivaroxaban (Xarelto), or dabigatran (Pradaxa) you must ask the prescribing provider if the medication can be temporarily stopped for your procedure. The number of days to reverse the blood thinning properties of your medication is variable, depending on which medication you have been prescribed. The radiology department can help guide you on when to stop taking your medication. Please note that this list of blood thinners is not comprehensive. Talk to your prescribing provider if you have any questions about your blood thinning medications. Bring all of your medications with you.

Do not smoke for at least 24 hours before your procedure.

Blood tests may be needed on the day of the procedure. Before your procedure, you will dress in a hospital gown and an intravenous (IV) line may be placed in one of your veins. Sometimes, IV fluids and medicines during the procedure.

You may need to remove your jewelry, and any oral appliances such as dentures or partials.

The recovery period after the procedure is variable but is usually 1 hour. If you receive sedation for this procedure, then you must have a person other than yourself as a driver.

Port Check

Preparation:

None needed.

Cryablation or Radiofrequency (RF) Ablation

Preparation:

Do not eat or drink after midnight on the night before your procedure. Most people can continue to take their prescribed medicines with small sips of water. If you are diabetic and take insulin, ask your doctor about modifying your insulin dose for the day of your procedure.

If you take a blood thinner (anticoagulant) such as warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel (Plavix), apixaban (Eliquis), heparin or enoxaparin, rivaroxaban (Xarelto), or dabigatran (Pradaxa) you must ask the prescribing provider if the medication can be temporarily stopped for your procedure. The number of days to reverse the blood thinning properties of your medication is variable, depending on which medication you have been prescribed. The radiology department can help guide you on when to stop taking your medication. Please note that this list of blood thinners is not comprehensive. Talk to your prescribing provider if you have any questions about your blood thinning medications. Bring all of your medications with you.

Do not smoke for at least 24 hours before your procedure.

Blood tests may be needed on the day of the procedure.

An anesthesiologist will administer deep sedation to make you comfortable for the procedure.

Before your procedure, you will dress in a hospital gown and an intravenous (IV) line may be placed in one of your veins. Sometimes, IV fluids and medicines during the procedure.

You may need to remove your jewelry, and any oral appliances such as dentures or partials.

The recovery period after the procedure is variable but is usually between 2 – 4 hours. You must have a person other than yourself as a driver.

Thrombolysis

Preparation:

Do not eat or drink after midnight on the night before your procedure. Most people can continue to take their prescribed medicines with small sips of water. If you are diabetic and take insulin, ask your doctor about modifying your insulin dose for the day of your procedure.

If you take a blood thinner (anticoagulant) such as warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel (Plavix), apixaban (Eliquis), heparin or enoxaparin, rivaroxaban (Xarelto), or dabigatran (Pradaxa) you must ask the prescribing provider if the medication can be temporarily stopped for your procedure. The number of days to reverse the blood thinning properties of your medication is variable, depending on which medication you have been prescribed. The radiology department can help guide you on when to stop taking your medication. Please note that this list of blood thinners is not comprehensive. Talk to your prescribing provider if you have any questions about your blood thinning medications. Bring all of your medications with you.

Do not smoke for at least 24 hours before your procedure.

Blood tests are usually done on the day of the procedure. Before your procedure, you will dress in a hospital gown and an intravenous (IV) line will be placed in one of your veins. The IV will be used to give you fluids and medicines during the procedure and will stay in place until after your procedure is completed.

You may need to remove your jewelry, and any oral appliances such as dentures or partials.

The recovery period after the procedure is variable but is usually between 2 – 4 hours. You may be hospitalized instead of discharged on the same day as the procedure. If you are discharged on the same day as the procedure, then you must have a person other than yourself as a driver.

TIPS (Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt)

Preparation:

Do not eat or drink after midnight on the night before your procedure. Most people can continue to take their prescribed medicines with small sips of water. If you are diabetic and take insulin, ask your doctor about modifying your insulin dose for the day of your procedure.

If you take a blood thinner (anticoagulant) such as warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel (Plavix), apixaban (Eliquis), heparin or enoxaparin, rivaroxaban (Xarelto), or dabigatran (Pradaxa) you must ask the prescribing provider if the medication can be temporarily stopped for your procedure. The number of days to reverse the blood thinning properties of your medication is variable, depending on which medication you have been prescribed. The radiology department can help guide you on when to stop taking your medication. Please note that this list of blood thinners is not comprehensive. Talk to your prescribing provider if you have any questions about your blood thinning medications. Bring all of your medications with you.

Do not smoke for at least 24 hours before your procedure.

Blood tests may be needed on the day of the procedure.

An anesthesiologist will administer deep sedation to make you comfortable for the procedure.

Before your procedure, you will dress in a hospital gown and an intravenous (IV) line may be placed in one of your veins. Sometimes, IV fluids and medicines during the procedure.

You may need to remove your jewelry, and any oral appliances such as dentures or partials.

You will be hospitalized at least for one night after the procedure.

Epidural Steroid Injection

Epidural Steroid Injections (ESI) are performed for relief of low back pain with leg pain. The epidural space is a tissue space surrounding the nerves and spinal cord. The ESI distributes medication to several nerves and disc margins in the lower spine simultaneously. It can be directed to the side and the level felt to be the most likely source of symptoms. A series of three injections may be prescribed to obtain maximum benefit.

Preparation:


Do not eat or drink 2 hours before your procedure.

 

If you take a blood thinner (anticoagulant) such as warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel (Plavix), apixaban (Eliquis), heparin or enoxaparin, rivaroxaban (Xarelto), or dabigatran (Pradaxa) you must ask the prescribing provider if the medication can be temporarily stopped for your procedure. The number of days to reverse the blood thinning properties of your medication is variable, depending on which medication you have been prescribed. The radiology department can help guide you on when to stop taking your medication. Please note that this list of blood thinners is not comprehensive. Talk to your prescribing provider if you have any questions about your blood thinning medications. Bring all of your medications with you.

 

Do not smoke for at least 24 hours before your procedure.

 

Blood tests are usually done on the day of the procedure. Before your procedure, you will dress in a hospital.

 

You may need to remove your jewelry, and any oral appliances such as dentures or partials.

 

The recovery period after the procedure is variable but is usually between 1 – 3 hours. Patients must have someone to drive them home following the procedure. After an epidural injection, as your legs may be weak and numb. Normal activity can be resumed after the procedure, though it is best to take it easy and avoid those movements and activities that typically cause your pain the day of the procedure.

Facet Block

Facet pain is neck or back pain that is usually made worse by twisting the body or bending. The area is usually painful if it is pressed. The pain radiates (spreads out) from your back or neck. For example pain may extend from your low back to your hips or legs. The purpose of this procedure is to determine if the joint is a source of your pain and to provide pain relief. A series of three injections may be prescribed to obtain maximum benefit.

 

Preparation:

Do not eat or drink 2 hours before your procedure.

 

If you take a blood thinner (anticoagulant) such as warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel (Plavix), apixaban (Eliquis), heparin or enoxaparin, rivaroxaban (Xarelto), or dabigatran (Pradaxa) you must ask the prescribing provider if the medication can be temporarily stopped for your procedure. The number of days to reverse the blood thinning properties of your medication is variable, depending on which medication you have been prescribed. The radiology department can help guide you on when to stop taking your medication. Please note that this list of blood thinners is not comprehensive. Talk to your prescribing provider if you have any questions about your blood thinning medications. Bring all of your medications with you.

 

Do not smoke for at least 24 hours before your procedure.

 

Blood tests are usually done on the day of the procedure. Before your procedure, you will dress in a hospital.

 

You may need to remove your jewelry, and any oral appliances such as dentures or partials.

 

The recovery period after the procedure is variable but is usually between 1 – 3 hours. Patients must have someone to drive them home following the procedure. After an epidural injection, as your legs may be weak and numb. Normal activity can be resumed after the procedure, though it is best to take it easy and avoid those movements and activities that typically cause your pain the day of the procedure.

 

 

Nerve Root Block

Nerve root blocks (NRB) are performed to relieve pain in one’s neck, back or legs and to confirm whether one’s pain and/or numbness arises from irritation of a particular nerve. The nerve root emerges from an opening near the spinal column and medication is deposited precisely at that site. A series of three injections may be prescribed to obtain maximum benefit.

Preparation:

Do not eat or drink 2 hours before your procedure.

 

If you take a blood thinner (anticoagulant) such as warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel (Plavix), apixaban (Eliquis), heparin or enoxaparin, rivaroxaban (Xarelto), or dabigatran (Pradaxa) you must ask the prescribing provider if the medication can be temporarily stopped for your procedure. The number of days to reverse the blood thinning properties of your medication is variable, depending on which medication you have been prescribed. The radiology department can help guide you on when to stop taking your medication. Please note that this list of blood thinners is not comprehensive. Talk to your prescribing provider if you have any questions about your blood thinning medications. Bring all of your medications with you.

 

Do not smoke for at least 24 hours before your procedure.

 

Blood tests are usually done on the day of the procedure. Before your procedure, you will dress in a hospital.

 

You may need to remove your jewelry, and any oral appliances such as dentures or partials.

 

The recovery period after the procedure is variable but is usually between 1 – 3 hours. Patients must have someone to drive them home following the procedure. After an epidural injection, as your legs may be weak and numb. Normal activity can be resumed after the procedure, though it is best to take it easy and avoid those movements and activities that typically cause your pain the day of the procedure.

P.A.S. PORT (PORTACATH)

A passport is a tube that can be used for intravenous medications, fluids, or nutritional solutions. Blood can also be drawn from it. The passport is placed in a blood vessel and attached to a dome shaped portal. The entire system is placed in the arm, under the skin.

Preparation:

Do not eat or drink after midnight on the night before your procedure. Most people can continue to take their prescribed medicines with small sips of water. If you are diabetic and take insulin, ask your doctor about modifying your insulin dose for the day of your procedure. If you are taking the oral medications for diabetes such as metformin (Glucophage, Glumetza, Fortamet), you will need to discontinue use 48 hours prior to the procedure and 48 hours following the procedure. Consult with your doctor about blood sugar control during this period.

 

If you take a blood thinner (anticoagulant) such as warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel (Plavix), apixaban (Eliquis), heparin or enoxaparin, rivaroxaban (Xarelto), or dabigatran (Pradaxa) you must ask the prescribing provider if the medication can be temporarily stopped for your procedure. The number of days to reverse the blood thinning properties of your medication is variable, depending on which medication you have been prescribed. The radiology department can help guide you on when to stop taking your medication. Please note that this list of blood thinners is not comprehensive. Talk to your prescribing provider if you have any questions about your blood thinning medications. Bring all of your medications with you.

 

You will likely receive intravascular iodinated contrast during this procedure. If you have experienced adverse reactions to intravenous (IV) contrast (x-ray dye) or iodine such as skin rash, difficulty breathing, or anaphylaxis, then please let your doctor and the radiology department know as soon as possible. Your doctors can then plan to take special precautions during the procedure or prescribe special medications prior to the procedure.

 

Do not smoke for at least 24 hours before your procedure.

 

Blood tests are usually done on the day of the procedure. Before your procedure, you will dress in a hospital gown and an intravenous (IV) line will be placed in one of your veins. The IV will be used to give you fluids and medicines during the procedure and will stay in place until after your procedure is completed.

 

You may need to remove your jewelry, and any oral appliances such as dentures or partials.

 

The recovery period after the procedure is variable but is usually between 4 – 6 hours. Patients must have someone to drive them home following the procedure.

Vertebroplasty

Percutaneous Vertebroplasty (PV) is an outpatient procedure performed for compression fractures of the spine. It can also be used for bone pain related to cancer. Compression fracture is the collapse of the individual bones of the spine (vertebrae) usually due to osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is the loss of bone structure in which bone becomes more porous. As the bone becomes increasingly fragile, the weight of the body compresses the vertebrae causing pain. When conservative treatment (pain medication, bedrest, a brace) doesn’t work, or the pain is severe and debilitating, percutaneous vertebroplasty can be performed.

 

For further information, please check out www.vertebroplasty.com.

 

Preparation:

Do not eat or drink after midnight on the night before your procedure. Most people can continue to take their prescribed medicines with small sips of water. If you are diabetic and take insulin, ask your doctor about modifying your insulin dose for the day of your procedure.

 

If you take a blood thinner (anticoagulant) such as warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel (Plavix), apixaban (Eliquis), heparin or enoxaparin, rivaroxaban (Xarelto), or dabigatran (Pradaxa) you must ask the prescribing provider if the medication can be temporarily stopped for your procedure. The number of days to reverse the blood thinning properties of your medication is variable, depending on which medication you have been prescribed. The radiology department can help guide you on when to stop taking your medication. Please note that this list of blood thinners is not comprehensive. Talk to your prescribing provider if you have any questions about your blood thinning medications. Bring all of your medications with you.

 

Do not smoke for at least 24 hours before your procedure.

 

Blood tests are usually done on the day of the procedure. Before your procedure, you will dress in a hospital gown and an intravenous (IV) line will be placed in one of your veins. The IV will be used to give you fluids and medicines during the procedure and will stay in place until after your procedure is completed.

 

You may need to remove your jewelry, and any oral appliances such as dentures or partials.

 

The recovery period after the procedure is variable but is usually between 1 – 2 hours. Patients must have someone to drive them home following the procedure.

 

Uterine Fibroid Embolization

Fibroid treatment graphic

 

 

 

 

Uterine Fibroid Embolization (UFE) has been available since 1992 to spare the uterus by treating uterine fibroids. Fibroids are benign tumors of the muscular wall of the uterus. Approximately 10-20% of fibroids cause symptoms. Patients report heavy, prolonged bleeding and cramping, pelvic pain and pressure, frequent urination and bowel movements, and painful intercourse. With the UFE procedure, patients experience 80-95% relief of symptoms. There is an average 50% reduction in fibroid size within 3 months. Patients followed up to 6 years have shown no regrowth of fibroids.

 

Preparation:

Do not eat or drink after midnight on the night before your procedure. Most people can continue to take their prescribed medicines with small sips of water. If you are diabetic and take insulin, ask your doctor about modifying your insulin dose for the day of your procedure. If you are taking the oral medications for diabetes such as metformin (Glucophage, Glumetza, Fortamet), you will need to discontinue use 48 hours prior to the procedure and 48 hours following the procedure. Consult with your doctor about blood sugar control during this period.

 

If you take a blood thinner (anticoagulant) such as warfarin (Coumadin), clopidogrel (Plavix), apixaban (Eliquis), heparin or enoxaparin, rivaroxaban (Xarelto), or dabigatran (Pradaxa) you must ask the prescribing provider if the medication can be temporarily stopped for your procedure. The number of days to reverse the blood thinning properties of your medication is variable, depending on which medication you have been prescribed. The radiology department can help guide you on when to stop taking your medication. Please note that this list of blood thinners is not comprehensive. Talk to your prescribing provider if you have any questions about your blood thinning medications. Bring all of your medications with you.

 

You will likely receive intravascular iodinated contrast during this procedure. If you have experienced adverse reactions to intravenous (IV) contrast (x-ray dye) or iodine such as skin rash, difficulty breathing, or anaphylaxis, then please let your doctor and the radiology department know as soon as possible. Your doctors can then plan to take special precautions during the procedure or prescribe special medications prior to the procedure.

 

Do not smoke for at least 24 hours before your procedure.

 

Blood tests are usually done on the day of the procedure. Before your procedure, you will dress in a hospital gown and an intravenous (IV) line will be placed in one of your veins. The IV will be used to give you fluids and medicines during the procedure and will stay in place until after your procedure is completed.

 

You may need to remove your jewelry, and any oral appliances such as dentures or partials.

 

The recovery period after the procedure is variable but is usually between 4 – 6 hours. Patients must have someone to drive them home following the procedure.